16 November 2010

Global Warming Good For Forests

From UD comes a piece regarding global, oops, I mean climate change (hide the decline), and how it INCREASED biodiversity in the Amazon. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, which happened 55.8 million years ago was one of the quickest and most dramatic increases in global temperature in the past 65 million years. The PETM can be seen at the highest point on this chart. In contrast the past million years, where we are now, is by a significant margin the coldest point on the chart. We're living in the coldest time in the past 65 million years!










Here's another chart of the past five million years. An unmistakable downward trend is visible in global temperature. Even if we warm the planet up like Algore and Michael Mann warn, there's no way we could possibly warm the earf up to pre five million years ago temperatures or enough to thaw Antarctica and flood the world.




The PETM saw a five degree C temperature increase and 2.5 times the atmospheric CO2 as we have today, and yet, much to the surprise of the global, climate change (hide the decline) believing scientists, who thought all life on earf should have burst into flames and tell tale evidence of SUVs and coal plants being the culprit, they found that biodiversity increased by a lot. In fact, whole families of plants appeared that hadn't been around before.

"Although some plant species disappeared, many more new species arose. That included entire families, suggesting that the increased temperatures and carbon dioxide levels actually boosted bidiversity. 'What we found was exactly the opposite of what we were expecting,' says Jaramillo."

Previous laboratory experiments have demonstrated that plants grow faster and larger in warmer, wetter, environments with more atmospheric CO2 (up to 4 times the levels today). Anyone but a carbon credit peddler can see that.

In fact, Jaramillo catches on after his study. He realizes that "deforestation is the real enemy, not the increase in temperature and carbon dioxide." Because the tropical rainforests lie within the poorest countries on the planet, and carbon credit peddlers like Algore don't want them to use their vast supplies of coal and oil to industrialize and produce nitrogen fertilizer and wipe out Malaria, the poor farmers have to slash and burn whole virgin forests. The poor farmers have to completely rape the land to plant one crop season, then the rain washes away the nutrients, turning the area to desert, and the farmers have to go and rape another forest to get one more crop. If we just stopped believing in climate change and started helping these people climb out of poverty we can fix the deforestation problem quickly and inexpensively. Poverty is the greatest threat to the environment, not SUVs or coal plants. Industrialized countries can afford to conserve the environment, whereas poor countries have to destroy the land just to survive.

-Dee

(Both charts created by Robert A. Rohde, and I'm supposed to say he does not necessarily endorse anything on The Urban Mystic)|

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